By Sara Hashemi


ISSUES


LATEST

The Art of the Two-Person Dance Party
By Tiia Kelly | "[The two-person dance party] becomes a shorthand for the characters embracing comfort in one another’s presence."
The Liminal Space of the Remington Party in Heathers
By Sydney Bollinger | "In choosing adolescence, Veronica pushes back on a narrative that asks her to give up her formative years in favor of social capital."
We Were Here: An Ode to the Wannabe Dance in One Tree Hill
By Claire White | "I’ll always want to return to these early seasons in an effort to remember what it felt to be that young and together with everyone again. There’s nothing quite like the high school years."
Seize the Day, or Rewatching Empire Records in the Age of COVID
By Mahnaz Dar | "[Empire Records'] ability to carve out space for joy, despite knowing that tomorrow may bring just as much sorrow, is stirring."
Editors’ Letter: The Turning Point
By Claire White and Odalis Garcia Gorra | "One good party can shift everything you understood to be true. What once was is upturned by the possibility of what could be. There is nothing that showcases that possibility more than teen films and TV shows."
The Art of “The Look”
By Niamh Cullen | "“The look” captures everything that I want. Betrayal, tension and pain met with acceptance of the longing. This look says to audiences ‘do you see where this is all leading? Have you backed the right horse?’"
In Defence of the Britney Spears movie ‘Crossroads’
By Claire White | "Through [Crossroads] audiences can learn something about the importance of control, not only for young girls, but for ourselves … Long before her conservatorship, this was Britney's message that we failed to understand, but must not forget."
How Gossip Girl Reboot Sinks into Teen Idealism (And Misses the Point)
By McKinzie Smith | "In this attempt to make its characters relatable, the show obscures the original point. It’s creating something new, it’s just not doing it very well yet."
How Meadow Soprano Ended Up Just Like Her Mother
By Shea Vassar | "Young Meadow is mean to her mother because she wants to be everything Carmela isn’t. Ironically, in the end, she becomes just like her."
‘Everything’s Gonna Be Okay’ Celebrates the Continual Discovery of Identity
By Claire Davidson | "[Matilda represents] an understanding of autistic self-definition that is still cognizant of boundaries with others as much as any flawed teenager can be."